Today's Health News in Snippets

20/MAY/2022

North Korea fighting Covid with traditional medicine.jpg

North Korea fighting Covid with traditional medicine

North Korea is dealing with the spread of Covid in an unvaccinated population that lacks access to effective anti-viral medications.

 

To try to protect itself from the pandemic, the country sealed its borders in early 2020.

So far, its leadership has rejected outside medical assistance.

 

According to the BBC, they have been monitoring state media, which is recommending various traditional treatments to deal with what is known as "fever."

 

For those who are not seriously ill, the ruling-party newspaper Rodong Simnun suggested ginger or honeysuckle tea and a willow-leaf drink.

 

A couple who recommended gargling with salt water morning and night was recently interviewed by state media.

 

The state news agency reported that "thousands of tonnes of salt" had been sent to Pyongyang to make "antiseptic solution."


For more, click here.

Oklahoma passes bill banning most abortions after conception.jpg

Oklahoma passes bill banning most abortions after conception

Oklahoma lawmakers passed a law prohibiting abortion after conception, which critics say is the most stringent of its kind in the United States.

 

The Republican-led bill would outlaw all abortions except those performed to save a woman's life or when the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest.

 

It comes after a report that the US Supreme Court may overturn a 1973 decision that legalised abortion nationwide.

 

Republican-led states in the United States are ramping up legislation to restrict abortion access.

 

On the other hand, US Senate Democrats attempted to pass a bill last week that critics claimed would allow abortion throughout the nine months of pregnancy. Republicans put a stop to it.

For more, click here.

Man who swallowed glasses arms for a bet begs doctors to remove them four years later.jpg

Man who swallowed glasses arms for a bet begs doctors to remove them four years later

Four years after swallowing a pair of spectacle arms for a bed on a drunken night out, a prankster begged doctors to remove them.

 

The man, who lives in Shanghai, China, previously avoided speaking with medics because he was too embarrassed.

 

But, in the end, the arms that had become trapped in his digestive system caused him so much pain that he had no choice but to seek medical attention.

 

Surprisingly, the glasses arms had not been discovered during any previous hospital visits.

 

Foreign bodies were discovered in the man's abdomen only after he was referred to a specialist.

 

Because of the length of time it had been in the body, surgeons were unsure if it could be removed without surgery.

 

Finally, it was decided to send him to Zhongshan Hospital to Professor Zhou Pinghong, a specialist in removing foreign objects from the body without the use of surgery.

 

The non-invasive procedure was successful, and the removal of the two arms reportedly took only 15 minutes.

For more, click here.

At least four migrants drown, 10 missing off Tunisia.jpg

At least four migrants drown, 10 missing off Tunisia

At least four migrants have drowned and ten more are missing after their boat capsized off the coast of Tunisia.

 

They were attempting to cross the Mediterranean to Italy, according to the Tunisian coastguard.

 

The coastguard rescued 44 people from an overcrowded boat that sank off the coast of Louza in Sfax governorate.

For more, click here.

7,256 Nigerian nurses left for UK in one year - Report.jpg

7,256 Nigerian nurses left for UK in one year - Report

The PUNCH has learned that between March 2021 and March 2022, 7,256 trained nurses in Nigeria relocated to the United Kingdom.

 

The figure was obtained on Thursday from the Nursing and Midwifery Council of the United Kingdom.

 

According to the PUNCH, Nigeria has seen an increase in the number of health workers leaving the country.

 

According to the data, 2,796 Nigerian nurses moved to the UK between March 2017 and March 2018, with an additional 3,021 arriving the UK between March 2018 and March 2019.

 

Between March 2019 and March 2020, a total of 3,684 Nigerian nurses migrated to the UK, according to the council.

 

During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, 4,310 Nigerian nurses registered with the council between March 2020 and March 2021.

 

However, between March 2021 and March 2022, the council saw the highest rate of registration in the previous five years, with a total of 7,256 Nigerian trained nurses registering.

For more, click here.

WHO approves 11th COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use.jpg

WHO approves 11th COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

Convidecia, a vaccine manufactured by CanSino Biologics in China, was added to the World Health Organization's growing portfolio of vaccines validated by WHO for the prevention of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 on Thursday.

 

As a prerequisite for COVAX vaccine supply, WHO's EUL procedure evaluates the quality, safety, and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines.

 

It also enables countries to expedite their own regulatory approval for the import and administration of COVID-19 vaccines.

 

Convidecia is the 11th drug approved by WHO to combat COVID-19.

For more, click here.

Thursday's Health News in Snippets

19/MAY/2022

Nigeria, Ethiopia, others affected by severe wasting, says UNICEF.jpg

Nigeria, Ethiopia, others affected by severe wasting, says UNICEF

According to data from a new report released by the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, Nigeria is one of the top ten countries affected by severe wasting in children under the age of five.

 

According to UNICEF data, India has the highest number of children suffering from severe wasting (5,772,472), while Nigeria ranks fourth with 482,590 cases. Indonesia and Pakistan came first and second, respectively, ahead of Nigeria.

 

Bangladesh, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, the Philippines, Niger, and South Africa are among the other countries.

 

According to a UNICEF report, one in every five deaths among children under the age of five is attributed to wasting, which is caused by a lack of nutritious food and repeated bouts of diseases such as diarrhoea, measles, and malaria, all of which compromise a child's immunity.


For more, click here.

Ukrainians seeking shelter in US must have TB screenings and certain vaccinations.jpg

Ukrainians seeking shelter in US must have TB screenings and certain vaccinations

Now that the Biden administration has approved the first group of displaced Ukrainians to enter through the new Uniting for Ukraine programme, the United States is preparing to welcome more. This month, Ukrainians began arriving through the programme.

 

Early in May, "The first notices were sent out allowing Ukrainian nationals to travel to the United States to seek parole through the Uniting for Ukraine process. Nearly 9,000 people can now book their own flights to the United States, with more travel authorizations expected in the coming days," according to Liza Acevedo, a spokesperson for the US Department of Homeland Security.
 

Those travellers must meet certain requirements to enter the United States, including vaccinations and infectious disease screenings.

 

Uniting for Ukraine is a streamlined process that allows Ukrainian citizens and their immediate family members to come to the United States on humanitarian grounds and stay for two years on a case-by-case basis. According to the Department of Homeland Security, they must have a sponsor in the United States who agrees to provide them with financial support.

For more, click here.

Mozambique detects first wild polio case in 30 years.jpg

Mozambique detects first wild polio case in 30 years

Mozambique has declared a wild polio outbreak after a young child in the country's north-eastern Tete province was diagnosed with the disease – the country's first case in 30 years.

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) says doctors discovered it when the child's paralysis began in late March.

 

A similar case was reported in neighbouring Malawi in February of this year.

 

The health ministry is planning a vaccination drive to reach children who are either unvaccinated or only partially protected in order to boost their immunity.

 

Only two countries in the world have wild polio endemicity: Afghanistan and Pakistan.

 

For more, click here.

Monkeypox investigated in US, Canada and Europe.jpg

Monkeypox investigated in US, Canada and Europe

According to health officials and local media reports, cases of suspected and confirmed monkeypox are being investigated in the United States, Canada, Spain, Portugal, and the United Kingdom.

 

One case was recently confirmed in the United States, and 13 suspected cases are being investigated in Canada.

 

Health officials have said, five infections have been confirmed in Portugal and seven in Spain.

 

Monkeypox is most prevalent in rural areas of Central and West Africa.

 

Cases of the disease outside the region are frequently linked to visits to the area.

For more, click here.

Mum cashes in on formula shortage by selling more than 113 litres of her own breastmilk.jp

Mum cashes in on formula shortage by selling more than 113 litres of her own breastmilk

A mum has profited from the baby formula shortage by selling over 113 litres of her own breastmilk.

 

According to Alyssa Chitti, she froze enough to fill three freezers before selling it online because it was easier than donating it to a local milk bank.

 

According to the Daily Star, a shortage of baby formula in the United States has resulted in reports of recalls and supply chain issues, making it difficult for mothers to feed their children.

 

Alyssa has stepped up to meet some of the demand by supplying her own breastmilk, but she says she is "running out of room" in her home for how much of the supply she still has to sell.

 

Buying and selling breast milk online is legal but unregulated, and Chitty stopped selling after receiving negative feedback, according to Fox 13.

For more, click here.

Woman gave birth 'unexpectedly' on plane as flight attendants help deliver baby girl - M.j

Woman gave birth 'unexpectedly' on plane as flight attendants help deliver baby girl

A woman "unexpectedly" gave birth in the middle of a flight, with the assistance of a flight attendant.

 

Frontier Airlines posted a photo of the baby on Facebook after the mother unexpectedly gave birth on the flight from Denver, Colorado to Orlando, Florida.

 

Diana Giraldo, an airline flight attendant, assisted the mother to the restroom at the back of the plane and assisted in the delivery of the baby girl, which has been given the middle name Sky.

 

The plane landed in Pensacola, Florida, where paramedics were waiting to assist the mother and her child.

For more, click here.

The Ethiopian father joins medical school at 69 - M.jpg

Ethiopian father joins medical school at 69

After enrolling in a university at the age of 69, an Ethiopian father of 11 has become a social media sensation in the country.

 

Tadesse Ghichile, who was orphaned at a young age, couldn't continue his formal education after middle school until much later.

 

He is now enrolled at Jimma University in the country's west, where he hopes to earn a medical degree.

 

Tadesse Ghichile is a farmer. He supports his family by working in a café in his village when he is not tilling the land.

 

Nonetheless, he found time to sit for – and pass – the national university entrance exam.

 

He is now a student at one of the country's largest universities.

 

For more, click here.

Bus driver 'high on crystal meth' left more than a dozen dead after horror crash.jpg

Bus driver 'high on crystal meth' left more than a dozen dead after horror crash

Officers say the driver of a bus that crashed and killed 14 people was high on crystal meth at the time of the collision.

 

When the vehicle carrying 34 people collided with an electronic traffic sign on Monday (May 16) in East Java, Indonesia, police said the driver did not have a licence.

 

According to reports, the bus was travelling down the Surabaya-Mojokerto Toll Road when the horrific crash occurred.

 

Medical crews were seen dragging the injured and dead from the bus, with the injured being rushed to a hospital in Mojokerto.

 

Police have yet to file formal charges, but they are gathering evidence related to the collision, which injured an additional 19 people.

 

They also claimed that the driver was a substitute who took over the wheel after the bus stopped at a rest area. He had driven for 17 kilometres (10 miles) before colliding with a traffic sign.

 

PO Ardiansyah, the tour company, is also being investigated by authorities and could face criminal charges for neglect if it is discovered that its bus drivers were unqualified for the job.

For more, click here.

Wednesday's Health News in Snippets

18/MAY/2022

Death toll in Nigeria blast mounts.jpg

Death toll in Nigeria blast mounts

According to Nigerian authorities, at least nine people were killed in an explosion near a primary school in the northern city of Kano.

 

The victims have been recovered from the rubble of a building destroyed by the blast outside the school, according to Nigeria's ministry of humanitarian affairs.

 

A portion of the school's roof was also blown off. The cause of the explosion is still being investigated by police, but initial reports indicate that it was caused by a gas cylinder in a welding shop.


For more, click here.

Stay away from bushmeat to prevent monkeypox, NCDC urges Nigerians.jpg

Stay away from bushmeat to prevent monkeypox, NCDC urges Nigerians

Dr. Ifedayo Adetifa, Director-General of the Nigerian Centre for Disease Control, has urged Nigerians to avoid eating bushmeat in order to prevent the spread of monkeypox.

 

On Tuesday, the NCDC chief stated this on Channels Television's Sunrise Daily.

 

He did, however, state that while there have been reports of monkeypox, no deaths have been reported as a result of the disease.

 

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization has warned that Nigeria is at risk of ongoing monkeypox transmission.

For more, click here.

Almost 1.13bn people worldwide suffer from hypertension - PAHO.jpg

Almost 1.13bn people worldwide suffer from hypertension - PAHO

According to the Pan American Health Organization, PAHO, over one billion people worldwide now have hypertension.

 

PAHO revealed that hypertension has become the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and premature death worldwide.

 

This was stated by PAHO in its message commemorating World Hypertension Day 2022.

 

It was noted that the disease's impact is now felt most acutely in low and middle-income countries, where two-thirds of cases are discovered, owing primarily to increased risk factors in those populations in recent decades.

 

The theme for World Hypertension Day 2022 is ‘Measure Your Blood Pressure Accurately, Control it, Live Longer.’

 

The Day is observed on May 17 each year to raise awareness and promote hypertension by encouraging people to measure their blood pressure.

 

Hypertension is a major cause of premature death.

For more, click here.

Prostate cancer screening is better than originally thought, especially for Black men, stu

Prostate cancer screening is better than originally thought, especially for Black men, study says

According to a new study, a blood test to screen for prostate cancer may be more effective than experts previously thought, particularly among Black men.

 

According to the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no standard test for prostate cancer. A digital rectal exam and a blood test for prostate specific antigen (PSA), an enzyme that is typically higher in men with prostate cancer, are two of the more commonly used tests.

 

Not only was the test more effective than scientists had anticipated, but the study found that the net benefit for Black men is even greater than for the general population.

For more, click here.

Smokers on the rise in Africa, according to a tobacco report.jpg

Smokers on the rise in Africa, according to a tobacco report

According to a report on global tobacco consumption, while the number of smokers has decreased globally, it is increasing in Africa.

 

According to the Tobacco Atlas report, which was compiled by a consortium of public health organisations and US academics, global smoking rates decreased from 22.6 percent in 2007 to 19.6 percent in 2019.

 

However, the authors of the report, Vital Strategies and Tobacconomics at the University of Illinois, stated that areas of the world experiencing population growth, such as Africa, the eastern Mediterranean, and the western Pacific, had increasing numbers of smokers.

 

In at least ten African countries, the prevalence was increasing among both adults and young people.

For more, click here.

Mum and daughter, 12, poisoned and rushed to hospital after eating garden mushrooms.jpg

Mum and daughter, 12, poisoned and rushed to hospital after eating garden mushrooms

A woman and her 12-year-old daughter were taken to hospital after eating toxic home-grown mushrooms, raising concerns about fungi poisoning in Australia.

 

Alice Both reported seeing "white, button-like mushrooms" in her vegetable patch and cooking them to eat with a meal. Ms Both said they "tasted fine," but she didn't realise they were deadly until the next morning.

 

Fortunately, her daughter had only eaten a few mouthfuls of food, so her symptoms were minor in comparison, but they both ended up in A&E.

 

Ms Both stated that when she first noticed symptoms, she used an app to identify the mushroom. Angie Bone, Victorian deputy chief health officer, explained that this could be a mistake.

 

"Consuming just one death cap mushroom can result in liver failure and death, so if you are not an expert and absolutely certain of the species of mushroom, do not pick or eat it," she said.

For more, click here.

Beloved family dog tears off boy's cheek after stroking her while pet ate steak.jpg

Beloved family dog tears off boy's cheek after stroking her while pet ate steak

A heartbroken family was forced to put down their 'sweet and protective' dog after she tore off their five-year-old son's cheek, rendering him unable to smile.
 

On January 8, Brantley Manion was pounced on by Mountain Cur English pointer cross Marley while they were sitting in the boy's bedroom watching a Disney movie.

 

Amanda, 35, says she and her partner Christopher, 34, were sitting in the living room when they heard blood-curdling screams coming from the bedroom.

 

They rushed upstairs and discovered the dog had pinned Brantley down and was attacking him.

 

Marley has been with the couple since she was nine weeks old, and they describe her as the "sweetest and most protective" pet they've ever had.

 

However, they believe the three-year-old dog turned on Brantley when he attempted to pet her while she was eating a steak.

 

The toddler, who insisted from his hospital bed that "Marley didn't mean it," is unable to smile because of torn ligaments that have caused facial paralysis.

For more, click here.

One in six killed by pollution worldwide, study finds.jpg

One in six killed by pollution worldwide, study finds

According to a new study, pollution killed one in every six people worldwide in 2019 – more than war, malaria, HIV, tuberculosis, drugs, or alcohol combined.

 

According to the study, published Tuesday by the Lancet Commission on pollution and health, pollution kills 9 million people each year, nearly three-quarters of whom are killed by harmful air.

 

Deaths from air pollution and toxic chemical pollution have increased by 66% in the last two decades, owing to uncontrolled urbanisation, population growth, and reliance on fossil fuels, the study revealed.

For more, click here.

Blood test detects most early bowel cancer, a trial reveals.jpg

Blood test detects most early bowel cancer, a trial reveals

According to a trial, a simple blood test could be the key to saving thousands of lives worldwide from bowel cancer.

 

Swansea University researchers developed the blood test, which employs Raman spectrometry, with funding from Cancer Research Wales and Health and Care Research Wales.

 

A trial found that the test detected approximately 80% of early-stage cancers.

 

Within two years, the NHS in England could implement the test.

 

The trial with GPs in Wales has just concluded. There are hopes that the test will be implemented across the UK and then globally.

For more, click here.

Tuesday's Health News in Snippets

17/MAY/2022

Nigeria at risk of ongoing monkeypox transmission, WHO warns.jpg

Nigeria at risk of ongoing monkeypox transmission, WHO warns

According to the World Health Organization, Nigeria is at risk of continuing transmission of monkeypox because the source of the infection in the country is unknown.

 

The WHO, on the other hand, stated that the risk of further transmission from the confirmed case in the United Kingdom is low.

 

On May 7, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control was notified by the UK International Health Regulations national focal point of a case of monkeypox discovered in a patient with a recent travel history to Nigeria.

 

The individual is a UK resident who arrived in Nigeria on April 20, visited Lagos and Delta States during his stay, left Lagos on May 3, and returned to the UK on May 4.


For more, click here.

A third of mosquito bites occur during the day, according to a study - M.jpg

A third of mosquito bites occur during the day, according to a study

A study of malaria-carrying mosquito biting behaviour in the Central African Republic discovered that up to one-third of blood-feeds occur indoors during the day.

 

Previous research has focused anti-malarial efforts on insecticide-treated bed nets, based on the assumption that the insects bite mostly at night.

 

According to the new research, malaria defences should be extended beyond the home to include schools, workplaces, and retail establishments.

 

Researchers published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences after conducting a year-long study of mosquitos collected after biting events in Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic.

For more, click here.

Filthy and illegal chicken factory shut down as inspectors find horrific conditions.jpg

Filthy and illegal chicken factory shut down as inspectors find horrific conditions

Inspectors ordered the closure of an illegal chicken factory after discovering employees working in filthy and unsanitary conditions.

 

When environmental health officers visited Boola Halal in Oldham, they discovered dirty walls and floors, an unconnected basin, and blocked drains.

 

According to the Manchester Evening News, one shocking photo shows raw meat dumped on the floor.

 

Despite being told to close immediately, the chicken supplier to restaurants and takeaways continued to operate and was later taken to court and fined more than £8,700.

For more, click here.

Cataracts may soon be treated with a miracle drug rather than surgery - 1.jpg

Cataracts may soon be treated with a miracle drug rather than surgery

According to hopeful scientists, a world-first drug could soon be used to treat cataracts instead of eye surgery.

 

UK researchers discovered that when mice were given eye drops containing a compound called VP1-001, their lens' ability to focus improved in 61% of cases.

 

It also improved clarity in 46% of those who were treated.

 

Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness in the world.

 

The researchers behind the potentially "revolutionary" discovery say it could mean patients no longer need an invasive procedure to replace their eyeball's lens.

For more, click here.

A'metal detector' is being used to detect the spread of breast cancer - 1.jpg

A 'metal detector' is being used to detect the spread of breast cancer

A noisy device that works like a metal detector is being recommended in draft guidance for the NHS to help spot and treat breast cancer that may have spread.

 

The Sentimag probe detects Magtrace, a magnetised liquid injected into the tissue surrounding the cancer.

 

It follows the fluid's path, bleeping as it passes over the skin, to determine where cancer may have seeded.

 

A surgeon can then take a sample or biopsy of the area to see if cancer is present.

 

The draft recommendation by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) could assist more hospitals in England and Wales in performing checks.

 

Some hospitals are currently using a harmless radioactive dye injection and scan instead, but this is not universally available.

For more, click here.

Haemorrhage, hypertension responsible for 50% of maternal deaths in Africa - WHO.png

Haemorrhage, hypertension responsible for 50% of maternal deaths in Africa - WHO

The World Health Organization has identified haemorrhage complications and hypertension as major killers of pregnant women in Africa.

 

According to the World Health Organization, complications from haemorrhage and hypertension account for nearly half of maternal mortality in the region.

 

The WHO urged member countries to ensure that all women and girls have access to high-quality, timely health care, particularly during pregnancy, childbirth, and after delivery, emphasising that no one should be left behind.

 

Dr. Owen Kaluwa, WHO Representative in South Africa, revealed this in a statement published on the website of the WHO Regional Office for Africa, emphasising the importance of the region looking at health workers' skills in addressing the problem.

For more, click here.

At least four dead after blast near Nigeria school - police.jpg

At least four dead after blast near Nigeria school - police

According to police, an explosion near a primary school in the northern Nigerian city of Kano killed at least four people and destroyed a shop.

 

The impact of the blast also blew a portion of the school's roof off.

 

According to police, an investigation is underway, but preliminary reports indicate that it was caused by a gas cylinder from a welding shop, ruling out an attack.

 

Immediately following the explosion, emergency services and security forces rushed to the Sabon Gari neighbourhood.

 

According to the authorities, no school children were among those killed.

For more, click here.

Newborn forced to get 11 stitches after she fell out of pregnant mum head first.jpg

Newborn forced to get 11 stitches after she fell out of pregnant mum head first

After falling out of her pregnant mother head first, a newborn baby required 11 stitches.

 

Josian Marques Pereira, a mother from Brazil, has slammed the Sofia Feldman Maternity Hospital for "negligence."

 

Olivia, her baby, required stitches after falling head first onto the hospital floor while her mother was standing on May 6.

 

Officers have launched an investigation into the hospital in southern Brazil.

 

According to an incident report, Josian, who was heavily pregnant, began having contractions and was rushed to the hospital.

 

She claims she begged for assistance as soon as she arrived but was left waiting for approximately 40 minutes.

 

When a nurse finally arrived, she was told she'd have to walk to another room, but Josiane refused because she could feel her child erupting.

 

Despite this, she was forced to get up and walk, according to the report.

 

Josiane didn't have time to leave the hospital reception before her baby fell out and hit the floor, suffering head trauma.

For more, click here.

Prolonged grief disorder now a mental health condition, group says.jpg

Prolonged grief disorder now a mental health condition, group says

Prolonged grief disorder is a mental health condition, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

 

According to the most recent edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, prolonged grief disorder is now officially classified as a mental health disorder requiring treatment.

 

In a press release, the American Psychiatric Association – an organisation that defines and categorises mental disorders – provided this update.

 

The American authority on mental health stated that prolonged grief disorder occurs when someone close to the bereaved person dies within six months for children and adolescents, or within 12 months for adults.

For more, click here.

Monday's Health News in Snippets

16/MAY/2022

Over a million Covid cases feared in North Korea.jpg

Over a million Covid cases feared in North Korea

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has slammed health officials and ordered the army to assist in the distribution of medicine as a wave of Covid cases sweeps the country.

 

According to state media, more than a million people have been sickened by what Pyongyang is calling a "fever."

 

There have been 50 deaths, but it is unclear how many of those suspected cases tested positive for Covid.

 

Because North Korea has limited testing capacity, only a few cases have been confirmed.


For more, click here.

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Covid mask rule partially eased for EU air travel

Face masks are no longer required for flights to many EU destinations, but Germany, Greece, Italy, and Spain are among the countries that still require them.

 

The EU's easing, which takes effect on Monday, is in line with changing Covid guidance on public transportation across Europe.

 

Face masks are no longer required on planes, trains, or buses in France.

 

However, Italy requires passengers to continue wearing the more protective FFP2 masks on public transportation until June 15.

 

The following countries in the EU's 27-member bloc still require face masks on flights: Portugal, Austria, Cyprus, Estonia, Lithuania, Malta, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg.

 

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) announced the EU-wide easing last week, saying "it is a relief to all of us that we are finally reaching a stage in the pandemic where we can start to relax the health safety measures."

For more, click here.

Man who had sore throat finds out he has HIV as he urges people to get tested.jpg

Man who had sore throat finds out he has HIV as he urges people to get tested

A man has spoken out about how his sore throat turned out to be HIV, and he has urged others to get tested.

 

He explained in a TikTok video clip how he thought he had the common condition and that there was nothing to worry about.

 

Kyle Dallape, a marketing director from California, was later diagnosed by his doctor with strep throat, a bacterial infection.

 

The 27-year-symptoms old's began to worsen, with weight loss, oral thrush, and swollen lymph nodes, as well as the bacterial infection reappearing twice.

 

He realised something was wrong after losing 30 pounds.

 

He didn't believe his symptoms could be linked because he had been tested for HIV a few weeks before his initial diagnosis and the results were negative.

 

However, after additional testing in June 2018, he was diagnosed with the virus, which devastated him.

 

"My worst nightmare had come true," Kyle said.

 

"My parents, friends, and now-fiancee were all crucial in getting me started on treatment and realising that my life wasn't over."

 

"A month later, I began Biktarvy, a once-daily HIV treatment pill, and by November of that year, I had reached undetectable levels of the virus."

 

"Since then, my T-cell count has continued to rise, and my viral load has remained undetectable."

 

He decided to share his ordeal on TikTok in order to raise awareness and break the stigma surrounding HIV.

For more, click here.

Lassa fever killed 151 people in Nigeria in 17 weeks, says NCDC.jpg

Lassa fever killed 151 people in Nigeria in 17 weeks, says NCDC

The Lassa fever disease has been managed in 723 cases at the case management centre in Nigeria.

 

According to the PUNCH, the disease's death toll has continued to rise, with the country reporting 151 deaths so far.

 

A total of 23 states have confirmed cases of the disease.

 

On Sunday's Lassa fever situation report, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control noted this on its website.

For more, click here.

Delhi suffers at 49C as heatwave sweeps India.jpg

Delhi suffers at 49C as heatwave sweeps India

An intense heatwave is sweeping through northern India, with temperatures reaching a record 49.2 degrees Celsius (120.5 degrees Fahrenheit) in parts of the capital, Delhi.

 

This is the capital's fifth heatwave since March.

 

Temperatures are expected to remain high in many parts of the country, prompting officials to advise residents to take precautions.

 

They warned that the heat could endanger the health of the most vulnerable people, such as infants, the elderly, and those suffering from chronic diseases.

For more, click here.

Cancer mum outlives life expectancy by 7 years.jpg

Cancer mum outlives life expectancy by 7 years

In 2015, doctors gave a mother only 12 months to live, but she defied doctors and said she was "stubbornly" clinging to life.

 

Heidi Loughlin of Portishead discovered she had breast cancer while pregnant with Ally Louise Smith.

 

She postponed treatment in order to have Ally 12 weeks early, but Ally died shortly after birth.

 

She attributes her survival to good mental health and regular exercise.

 

Ms. Loughlin has chemotherapy every three weeks and hopes to leave a legacy for her other children.

 

The podcaster recently revealed that she was nearing the end of her cancer treatment.

 

For more, click here.